Monday, 14 September 2020

Deaf Centre Manitoba (DCM), Inc. Board's Memo: Formal Announcement

                                               [ASL Signer: Jordan Sangalang]

Saturday, 1 August 2020

Life in a pandemic isn't easy, but performer Jordan Sangalang has a few tricks

JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Performer Jordan Sangalang saw his Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival plans put on hold this summer. As the pandemic affects his life, he’s still convinced laughter is the best medicine. Like everyone else, Jordan Sangalang, 34, had plans disrupted by COVID-19 this spring. Sangalang, a deaf performer last seen on the Winnipeg stage in the 2017 production Tribes at Winnipeg Jewish Theatre, is also a member of the deaf physical comedy troupe 100 Decibels. When the lockdown hit, he and his fellow players were preparing a "comeback" at the Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival. The pandemic threw those plans in a blender. "There were too many uncertainties and it left us at a standstill," Sangalang says in an email interview. "Our rehearsals and performances require space for us to meet and it’s typically in a studio. With the lockdown that occurred, we were not able to find a space to do rehearsals." When the festival was cancelled altogether, Sangalang at least had the consolation of participating in the free online fringe show two weeks ago, co-hosting one evening of performances with Ray Strachan. The experience connected him to the thrill of performing. "I enjoyed co-hosting with him and going on live," Sangalang says. "Live performances are something I have genuinely missed." These days, it helps that Sangalang is now a father to a toddler with his partner Kristina, an ASL (American Sign Language) interpreter. "It is a gift," he says of fatherhood. "It does makes staying at home easy." That is an element of the five things Sangalang says he needs to survive the pandemic. 1. Video calls "Since physical and social distancing took place, especially when we weren’t able to get together with family and friends, it took a toll on me for a bit," Sangalang says. "As an introvert myself, I admit I enjoyed it in the beginning," he says. "But as weeks went by, I started to feel that I was missing something." It turned out the missing thing was communication. It dawned on Sangalang when he participated with an impromptu video call with a friend. "(We) just chatted away about life, laughter, and the like," he says. "That was the moment I realized: I miss hanging out with people. "I sure am grateful we were able to chat through video," he says. "I communicate using sign language. So, video calls are a necessity for us to be able to communicate." 2. Family Sangalang’s extended family — his parents and siblings — no longer live in Winnipeg. His parents moved to Florida along with one of his siblings. Another sibling is in Ontario. His wife’s family lives in British Columbia. "I do have a number of cousins here in Manitoba as well. Still, during the lockdown, we weren’t able to visit each other. "So I am thankful for my little family," he says. "My spouse makes sure there are bags of Old Dutch ketchup chips and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups around for me to snack on for breakfast... I mean morning, and late-night snacks," he says. "My baby keeps me busy by making sure diapers are clean and just keeps me entertained," he says. "We, as family, share a lot of laughs. They say laughter is the best medicine. We might as well laugh till vaccination for the coronavirus is available!" JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS “By having sign language interpreters, it creates bridges to collaborate with other artists and performers,” Sangalang says. 3. Reading "I have a ton of books," Sangalang says. "It is difficult to commit to finishing as many books as I want to before I became a parent. So, I just resort to stuff I read in social media. "I (still) read some books I have around the house whenever I walk by," he says. "I go to the basement, I have books there. I go to the washroom, I read a couple of business-related books while doing my business. "But more often than I’d like to admit, I scroll through tweets and such," he says. "I suppose they help keep me in the loop with what is going on. Since radio is not accessible to me, news through social media is what keeps me connected." 4. Mirror "I have a mirror in my living room. When it is just me and my baby at home, we do little performances in front of the mirror," Sangalang explains. "Since we communicate using ASL, this makes things more fun for us. "My baby’s little facial expressions and little signing hands are just adorable," he says. "Makes me laugh too and vice-versa. "Anyway, (the) mirror is something I use to keep my creative juices flowing whether it’s physical sketch or visual vernacular," he says, explaining that visual vernacular "is a mix of mime and sign language — think of it in storytelling in sign language in a cinematic view. "Interesting things from this mind I have come out of these hands I have." 5. Sign language interpreters "By having sign language interpreters, it creates bridges to collaborate with other artists and performers," Sangalang says. "By being able to do so, we had the opportunity to share our creativity and perspectives with each other. "It is a necessity for us as performers to collaborate. This has been especially beneficial when having group meetings through video conference meetings. Professionally trained interpreters ensure quality of communication and collaborative work on a high standard." randall.king@freepress.mb.ca Twitter: @FreepKing

Tuesday, 21 July 2020

Manitoba looks at starting Phase 4 reopening amid coronavirus as early as July 25 - ASL Video will be coming soon

Police silent after discovering body of Martin Carpentier Will 'get worse before it gets better': Trump at 1st coronavirus briefing in… © THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister will discuss "restoring safe services" Tuesday morning. Manitoba's premier says the province is looking at moving into the next phase of reopening amid COVID-19 -- including increasing gathering sizes, opening casinos to half-capacity, and lifting restrictions on retail and indoor recreation sites -- as early as this weekend. Brian Pallister said Tuesday the province is looking for public feed back on the plan, which could see the fourth phase of reopening kick in starting as early as July 25. Read more: Manitoba to make bid for Winnipeg to be a CFL hub city, should season go ahead “Thanks to the efforts of all Manitobans, we continue to lead in recovery and have among the lowest COVID-19 test positivity rates in the country,” said Pallister in a release. “That means we can continue our careful, balanced plan to restart our economy, give people back their lives and get Manitobans back to work.” The province's draft plan for Phase Four reopening includes: increasing gathering sizes to 75 people indoors and 250 outdoors, where members of the public are reasonably able to maintain a separation of at least two metres from others, except for brief exchanges. Larger group sizes would be allowed where distinct groups of 75 or 250 can be separated to prevent contact with other groups. increasing visitation at personal care and long-term care facilities, ensuring a balanced approach to visitation is required which mitigates the risk of COVID-19 transmission within sites. Each resident or designate would be able to identify two support people who would be able to visit the resident’s room indoors. Outdoor visits would be allowed for a reasonable number of visitors (up to four people) per resident, depending on availability of space. Each site will need to develop specific plans for enabling outdoor/indoor visitation by visitors to ensure the safety of residents within the facilities. adjusting restrictions for faith-based gatherings, pow wows and other cultural and spiritual events, as well as resuming live theatrical performances and movie theatres. No cohorts will be required and capacity will increase to 50 per cent of the site’s capacity or 500 people, whichever is lower. Adequate physical distancing between individuals and households must continue to be provided. opening casinos, with a maximum occupancy of 50 per cent of the site’s capacity. Physical distancing, and frequent and enhanced cleaning and wiping of surfaces are required. lifting occupancy restrictions in all retail settings and indoor recreation sites except for gyms, fitness centres, martial arts, gymnastic clubs and yoga studios. These sites must remain at occupancy levels of 50 per cent or one person per 10 square metres, whichever is lower. allowing closer distancing at therapeutic health businesses and personal service businesses such as hair and nail salons where a non-permeable barrier is installed. allowing counter walk-up service in bars, beverage rooms and brew pubs provided non-permeable barriers and hand sanitizer is available for patrons, along with more frequent cleaning and wiping of services. The province is also looking at removing the 14-day, self-isolation travel restriction for domestic travel within Canada, the premier added. Currently, anyone entering Manitoba from the Atlantic provinces and Quebec, as well as Ontario communities east of Terrace Bay -- a small community on Lake Superior -- are required to self-isolate for two weeks. Pallister said Manitoba is the only province outside the Atlantic region with such a rule for domestic visitors, and doing away with it can be done safely. "We've demonstrated that we have the discipline to live with each other while maintaining ... distancing, while doing our hand-washing, while keeping each other safe," Pallister said. "I would say to those who are afraid, I'm afraid too, I'm afraid too. But I'm not going to let fear rule my life and I'd ask you not to let fear rule yours." Manitobans can weigh in on the proposed changes at the province's website and a telephone town hall meeting is planned for Wednesday. On Monday the premier announced the province will make a bid for Winnipeg to be a hub city for a shortened CFL season amid COVID-19, should the league go ahead with play later this year. He said the province is committing $2.5 million to help encourage the CFL to choose Winnipeg. Pallister said the money will come from an $8 million event attraction strategy, aiming to “maximize the potential” of destinations in both Winnipeg and rural Manitoba to host “large-scale meetings, conventions, and events.” Manitoba has recorded 366 confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases to date -- a lower rate than most other provinces. Seven people have died and 41 cases remained active Tuesday. The province had dropped to one active case on July 13, but has seen an outbreak on a few Hutterite colonies in recent days and a couple of positive tests among international travellers. The Opposition New Democrats said the government should hire more nurses and child-care workers as more businesses open up, and also consider a greater focus on masks. "The province should start encouraging Manitobans (to) wear masks as a reasonable tradeoff to keep families safe as additional reopening measures are implemented," NDP Leader Wab Kinew said in a written statement. Liberal Leader Dougald Lamont criticized the loosening of interprovincial travel rules. "The Premier seems to think that Manitoba is somehow immune from COVID-19. We have not beaten it. We have only kept it at bay," Lamont said. Questions about COVID-19? Here are some things you need to know: Symptoms can include fever, cough and difficulty breathing — very similar to a cold or flu. Some people can develop a more severe illness. People most at risk of this include older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease. If you develop symptoms, contact public health authorities. To prevent the virus from spreading, experts recommend frequent handwashing and coughing into your sleeve. They also recommend minimizing contact with others, staying home as much as possible and maintaining a distance of two metres from other people if you go out. In situations where you can't keep a safe distance from others, public health officials recommend the use of a non-medical face mask or covering to prevent spreading the respiratory droplets that can carry the virus. In some provinces and municipalities across the country, masks or face coverings are now mandatory in indoor public spaces.

Sunday, 5 July 2020

Starting July 1st, 2020- On street paid parking will decrease .75 cent!

Beginning July 1, on-street paid parking will decrease $0.75. Download the PayByPhone app now to pay new rates while paystations are reprogrammed.

Manitoba schools 'will rely heavily' on parents dropping off students next fall: education minister= ASL VLOG coming soon

Fewer Manitoba students will be singing about the wheels on the bus when they go back to class in the fall, the province says. To ensure physical distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be less capacity on school buses. That means schools will rely on parents who can transport their kids to class, Education Minister Kelvin Goertzen said during a news conference Thursday. "[Getting kids to school] is probably the biggest challenge, and … probably the one that department officials and public health wrestled with the most," Goertzen said. "We will rely heavily on parents who are able to bring their kids to school to do that, and that, I think, will alleviate a lot of the pressures." In which regions parents are most able to drop off their kids, and how much pressure parents truly take off of the schools, won't be known until the fall, he said. But he cited a survey sent to parents with school-aged children in Manitoba, which received 30,000 responses — about half of which said parents could and are willing to drive their kids to school during the pandemic. Goertzen noted that dropping kids off at school may be inconvenient, but the pandemic has been "inconvenient for everybody." The Winnipeg School Division received information about back-to-school "at about the same time as the public," a spokesperson said. "We're going to take some time today and tomorrow to review it and identify what additional items we need to apply to our existing framework for reopening schools in WSD." The Louis Riel School Division is keeping its focus on community safety and support, and guidance from the province will inform its planning and decisions, said superintendent Christian Michalik through a spokesperson. "Our goal is to create an approach that maximizes well-being and mitigates risk," said Michalik, adding that a "comprehensive plan for a safe return to schools" will be available no later than June 30. The safety issues schools will have to navigate will revolve around the significant increase in traffic, including ensuring physical distancing occurs on school grounds, and the safety of students walking or biking to school, said James Bedford, president of the Manitoba Teachers' Society, which represents 16,000 public school teachers. Survey seeks input from Manitobans on reopening schools to students That responsibility will likely fall to school principals, said Bedford. "Teachers want students to be safe, and I've not met a school principal who has not said student safety is one of our priorities," he said. CBC News contacted other school divisions around Winnipeg and the Manitoba School Boards Association for comment, but had not heard back as of Thursday night. Brenda Brazeau, executive director Manitoba Association of Parent Councils, an organization that speaks for parents with kids in public school, warns that the province may receive some flak if parents start getting penalized for driving their kids to school. "Say they work at seven o'clock, and all of a sudden they're dropping their kids off at eight o'clock at school, they're an hour late. How is that going to evolve?" said Brazeau, who is also a mother of six. The province also has to consider what to do if someone is written up for being late to work, and how to accommodate families without automobiles, she said. Brenda Brazeau, executive director of the Manitoba Association of Parent Councils, says the province must think of possible issues parents will face by having to drop their kids off at school. (Trevor Brine/CBC) Resorting to other drop-off arrangements also presents an opportunity for schools to promote active transportation, says Sean Carlson, sustainable transportation co-ordinator at Green Action Centre in Winnipeg. "With disruptions being the best time to change behaviours and change habits, that by only emphasizing kids being driven to school, we're missing out on a really valuable opportunity to turn things around," said Carlson, who works directly with schools on active transportation. Carlson points to designated active transportation routes in Winnipeg, including a stretch of Wellington Crescent, that allows people to walk and bike on the road as an example. He notes that implementing such plans depends on the individual school, but says that even designated drop-off zones a short distance from the school would allow opportunities for less vehicular traffic, and children to gain independence by walking to school safely. The Louis Riel School Division is keeping its focus on community safety and support, and guidance from the province will inform its planning and decisions, said superintendent Christian Michalik through a spokesperson. "Our goal is to create an approach that maximizes well-being and mitigates risk," said Michalik, adding that a "comprehensive plan for a safe return to schools" will be available no later than June 30. The safety issues schools will have to navigate will revolve around the significant increase in traffic, including ensuring physical distancing occurs on school grounds, and the safety of students walking or biking to school, said James Bedford, president of the Manitoba Teachers' Society, which represents 16,000 public school teachers. Survey seeks input from Manitobans on reopening schools to students That responsibility will likely fall to school principals, said Bedford. "Teachers want students to be safe, and I've not met a school principal who has not said student safety is one of our priorities," he said. CBC News contacted other school divisions around Winnipeg and the Manitoba School Boards Association for comment, but had not heard back as of Thursday night. Brenda Brazeau, executive director Manitoba Association of Parent Councils, an organization that speaks for parents with kids in public school, warns that the province may receive some flak if parents start getting penalized for driving their kids to school. "Say they work at seven o'clock, and all of a sudden they're dropping their kids off at eight o'clock at school, they're an hour late. How is that going to evolve?" said Brazeau, who is also a mother of six. The province also has to consider what to do if someone is written up for being late to work, and how to accommodate families without automobiles, she said. Brenda Brazeau, executive director of the Manitoba Association of Parent Councils, says the province must think of possible issues parents will face by having to drop their kids off at school. (Trevor Brine/CBC) Resorting to other drop-off arrangements also presents an opportunity for schools to promote active transportation, says Sean Carlson, sustainable transportation co-ordinator at Green Action Centre in Winnipeg. "With disruptions being the best time to change behaviours and change habits, that by only emphasizing kids being driven to school, we're missing out on a really valuable opportunity to turn things around," said Carlson, who works directly with schools on active transportation. Carlson points to designated active transportation routes in Winnipeg, including a stretch of Wellington Crescent, that allows people to walk and bike on the road as an example. He notes that implementing such plans depends on the individual school, but says that even designated drop-off zones a short distance from the school would allow opportunities for less vehicular traffic, and children to gain independence by walking to school safely.

Health Canada posts recalls for three more hand sanitizer products

TORONTO -- Health Canada has added more hand sanitizer products to their growing recall list. The agency first announced recalls of some hand sanitizer products on June 6 due to the presence of industrial-grade ethanol, and has continued to update the list throughout the month. The following hand sanitizers were added to the recall list on Monday: Health Canada recalls more hand sanitizers containing industrial-grade ethanol Health Canada recalls six hand sanitizers containing industrial-grade ethanol Gel Antiseptique Pour Les Mains, made by Megalab Inc. Germzero, made by Flash Beaute Inc. Tekare Instant Hand Cleanser Gel, made by TEKPolymer Inc. The contaminant listed for these products is ethyl acetate. According to Health Canada, industrial-grade ethanol is harsher than the type of ethanol that has been approved for use in hand sanitizers in Canada. Industrial-grade ethanol also could contain extra chemicals not suited for use in hand sanitizers. A list of hand sanitizers approved for sale in Canada, as well as a list of similar products that have been accepted under COVID-19 interim measures can be found on Health Canada’s website. If you have purchased any of the recalled products, Health Canada recommends that you stop using them at once. Over-use could cause cracked skin and irritation. If you have any health concerns about your use of these products, contact your health-care provider. You can return the hand sanitizer to your local pharmacy for proper disposal, or follow the guidelines in your region for properly disposing of hazardous waste. The products listed in previous recalls on June 6, June 10 and June 11 are: Protectenol Hand Sanitizer Liquid, made by Applied Lubrication Technology Tidol Hand Sanitizer 70%, made by Tidol Corporation Aktif Antiseptique instantane pour les mains, made by Laboratoire Hygienex Inc. Smart Care Hand Sanitizer, made by R&D Technical Solutions Ltd. X-Pure Vert-2-Go Gel, Wood Wyant Inc. Eltraderm Hand Sanitizer - 70% Ethyl Alcohol, made by Eltraderm Limited Hand Sanitizer, made by Contract Packaging Distributions Inc. Gel 700 Hand Sanitizer, made by Nature's Own Cosmetic Company Inc. Sanilabs Hand Sanitizer 70% Ethanol, made by Sanilabs Inc. Walker Emulsions Hand Sanitizer, made by Walker Emulsions Ltd. Hand Sanitizer Desinfectant pour les mains, made by Walker Emulsions Ltd. Dash Vapes Hand Sanitizer, made by DashVapes Inc. Isogel, made by Lalema Inc.

Can I take a road trip this summer? Here’s which provinces are open to tourists

If you had to cancel your summer vacation because of COVID-19, you’re not alone. From nixed events and music festivals to restrictions on patios and restaurants, summer will look very different for most Canadians. But all hope is not lost. According to experts, this could be the perfect time to explore your own backyard — with a road trip. READ MORE: Your guide to summer — How to enjoy outdoor activities despite the pandemic This is especially true if your destination is the great outdoors, said Dr. Stan Houston, a professor of medicine at the University of Alberta and an expert in the prevention of communicable diseases. Going camping or canoeing with the family you’ve been living with during the pandemic is “one of the safest things you could do,” Houston said — especially if you take everything, like groceries, with you. “That would be unimaginably safe — you’re in the great outdoors,” he said. “Everything else you do that’s a bit different from that might potentially have some (risk).” Inter-provincial travel The risk level of a road trip will largely depend on your destination and its amount of community transmission, Houston said. If you’re from a big city like Montreal and you’re heading to a smaller nearby community with fewer instances of COVID-19, you need to be mindful that you could be carrying the virus and act accordingly. On the contrary, “if you come from a small, safe town and you’re taking holiday in Montreal, then the risk might be greater for you,” Houston said. “That’s one of the things to (consider) in terms of your safety.” Several provinces and territories have already implemented travel restrictions for those who are not residents of that region. Problems can arise when travel is done between provinces and an individual doesn’t isolate, Colin Furness, an infection control epidemiologist and assistant professor at the University of Toronto previously told Global News. B.C. still recommends that all non-essential travel beyond the B.C.-Alberta border be avoided. The province’s borders to the Yukon and Northwest Territories are also restricted to essential travel only and some highways are closed. Can I go to the beach or someone’s backyard? Here’s how risky summer activities are Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario do not have provincial travel bans. All three provinces, however, are advising against non-essential travel. Although it did at first, interprovincial travel between Manitoba and other western provinces, up to west of Terrace Bay in Ontario, no longer requires a two-week self-isolation period. Quebec has begun to loosen some travel restrictions that were implemented earlier in the pandemic. In April, checkpoints were created to bar travellers from too much mobility if they weren’t travelling for essential reasons. Most of the province has opened back up again, but some areas are still restricted — including the Cree territory of James Bay. Some provinces, like Nova Scotia, are imposing a mandatory 14-day quarantine for travellers coming from other parts of Canada. And even stricter regulations are in place in Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick. In Newfoundland and Labrador, only residents of the province can enter along with those who have extenuating circumstances. New Brunswick is prohibiting all non-essential travel and the province is screening all who enter and enforcing a mandatory 14-day quarantine. Canadian campgrounds have reopened for the summer. Here’s what will keep them safe Prince Edward Island is also barring all non-essential travel and anyone attempting to enter the province for non-essential reasons can be turned away, or be told to leave immediately if they are found to be there for the wrong reasons. New Brunswick has tied a new swath of cases to a doctor it claimed travelled to Quebec and did not isolate upon returning to the province. However, that doctor disputes the claim and is seeking an apology from New Brunswick, saying everyone he initially came into contact with has tested negative for the virus. Staying in a hotel The safety of a hotel depends on precautions both you and the hotel take during your stay. Canadian hotels are implementing strict cleaning protocols, and that, combined with physical distancing and good hand hygiene, should make it relatively safe for you to spend a night away from home in the near future, experts say. “If people take proper precautions and the hotel really does follow these strict cleaning protocols … I think there’s a way that people can reasonably enjoy some time out of their homes in the safest way possible,” said Dr. David Finn, the medical director at Massachusetts General Hospital. The main areas of concern at a hotel, says Finn, are interacting with staff and other guests in common areas and the way rooms are cleaned. To reassure potential guests, many hotels — from luxury resorts to budget-friendly brands — are sharing the changes they’re making on their websites. New practices may include adding hand sanitizer stations in lobbies, disinfecting surfaces like elevator buttons more frequently and removing extra items in rooms, such as pens and paper. Breakfast buffets may also be replaced with prepackaged meals. ‘Safe’ ways to socialize When it comes to visiting tourist attractions, “the devil’s in the details,” Houston said. “If you’re walking around a big city and it’s not super crowded and you’re maintaining your physical distance and perhaps wearing your mask … I think that would be a very low-risk activity,” he said. For public places like shared washrooms, you can assess if it’s safe enough for you to use, experts told Global News. Bending the rules to go to the cottage? Here’s how to be safe It’s important to remember that when it comes to COVID-19, the primary risk factor is the number of people you are around, Allison McGeer, an infectious diseases specialist at Mount Sinai Hospital, previously told Global News. “It is a little difficult in bathrooms sometimes to maintain social distancing. So that’s a bit of an issue,” McGeer said. But ultimately, making more of an effort to distance in a bathroom is a better option than leaving bathrooms closed, she said. From AC units to patio decor: 6 ways to upgrade your COVID-19 summer The most important precaution to take when using these facilities is to wash your hands thoroughly, because that will mitigate the risk of touching certain surfaces, she said. Ultimately, if you take all the necessary precautions and minimize interactions with other people in enclosed spaces like grocery stores, Houston said, a road trip should be pretty safe. Questions about COVID-19? Here are some things you need to know: Symptoms can include fever, cough and difficulty breathing — very similar to a cold or flu. Some people can develop a more severe illness. People most at risk of this include older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease. If you develop symptoms, contact public health authorities. To prevent the virus from spreading, experts recommend frequent handwashing and coughing into your sleeve. They also recommend minimizing contact with others, staying home as much as possible and maintaining a distance of two metres from other people if you go out. In situations where you can’t keep a safe distance from others, public health officials recommend the use of a non-medical face mask or covering to prevent spreading the respiratory droplets that can carry the virus. In situations where you can’t keep a safe distance from others, public health officials recommend the use of a non-medical face mask or covering to prevent spreading the respiratory droplets that can carry the virus.